Social Document Review: Collaborative Annotation

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connectionsWBG-200-CorGroup document reviews usually aren’t particularly ennobling. And in recent years we’ve learned that they can sometimes produce results that are worse than what we’d get from a well-trained machine.

That can change. We can use social technology to make group document reviews better, faster, and less costly, while making the reviewers’ work more professionally rewarding to them and more valuable to their employers. Continue reading

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Deduplication Protocol

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Please take a look at Craig Ball’s informative blog post on deduplication and my comment. Craig explains why deduplication isn’t more widely used even though it makes ediscovery faster and cheaper, and he describes the main methods of deduplication. I add my view that reasonable counsel should agree on a bilateral deduplication method before any deduplication is done, and I include a few considerations about how counsel should use proportionality to determine what method is appropriate under the circumstances.

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Statistically Improbable Phrases in Technology-Assisted Review

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amazonAmazon.com computes and displays “Statistically Improbable Phrases” for its indexed books. It defines a Statistically Improbable Phrase as “a phrase that occurs a large number of times in a particular book relative to all [indexed] books.” You can use similar statistics to help you improve your technology-assisted review. Continue reading

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